Military Infantry Division Patches

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Information extracted from the book
"US ARMY PATCHES"
by Barry Jason Stein
Used by permission

Divisions either organized before or during World War I did not use the designation "infantry."  The re-designation of these divisions as infantry came sometime after World War I when the divisions' structure was reorganized to include specialists in a wide variety of functions.  A standard infantry division of the World War II era, for example, was designed for open warfare and, consequently, a pool of motor transport and artillery were assigned to them.  It was this combined-arms formation that gained permanent status.  Specialized combat or logistical support was provided by corps and army-level units.  Beside the infantry division, motorized and airborne divisions were formed as well as a light (truck) division, a light (jungle) division, and a mountain division.  The airborne division was initially a miniature version of the infantry division with the addition of a small antiaircraft battalion, one parachute, and two glider regiments.


1st Inf Div patch Desert Storm
1st Inf Div
 
1st Inf Div patch

Worn from:  31 October 1918 - Current.

Organized in June 1917 in New York, New York.  The red arabic numeral one identifies the division's designation.  The First Division, during World War I, was the first to land in France, the first at the front, the first to fire at the enemy, the first to attack, the first to make a raid, the first to suffer casualties, and the first to inflict casualties.  They were also the first to be cited in general orders.

Current location:  Wuerzburg, Germany; Fort Riley, Kansas.

Campaigns:  World War I (Montdidier-Noyon, Ausne-Marne, St,-Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Lorraine 1917 and 1918, Picardy 1918), World War II (Algeria-French Morocco, Tunisia, Sicily, Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe), Vietnam (Defense, Counteroffensive and Phases II/III/IV/V/VI, Tet and Tet/69 Counteroffensive, Summer-Fall 1969, Winter-Spring 1970), Armed Forces Expeditions (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait).

Decorations:  French Crois de Guerre with Palm -- World War II (streamers embroidered Kasserine, and Normandy), French Croix de Guerre -- World War II Fourragere, Belgian Fourragere 1940, Cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action at Mons, and action at Eupen-Malmedy, Meritorious Unit Commendation (streamer embroidered Vietnam 1968), Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm (streamer embroidered Vietnam 1965 - 1968), Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal -- First Class (streamer embroidered Vietnam 1965 - 1970).


2nd Inf Div patch
2nd Inf Div

Worn from:  6 November 1918 - Current.

The Second Division was organized in October 1917 at Bourmont, Haute-Marne, France, from troops that were sent over separately.  The color markings (red, white, and blue) used to identify the division and their equipment in France were chosen  by the commander of the division as the colors for this insignia.  The star and Indian head signify the American origin of the division.

Current location:  Camp Casey, Korea; and Fort Lewis, Washington.

Campaigns:  World War I (Aisne, Aisne-Marne, St.-Mihiel, Meuse- Argonne, Ile-de-France 1918), World War II (Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe), Korean War (UN Defensive, UN Offensive, CCF Intervention, First UN Counteroffensive, CCF Spring Offensive, UN Summer-Fall Offensive, Second Winter, Summer-Fall 1952, Third Winter, Summer 1953).

Decorations:  French Croix de Guerre with Palm -- World War I (streamer embroidered Aisne-Marne), French Croix de Guerre with Palm --World War I (streamer embroidered Meuse-Argonne), French Croix de Guerre -- World War I Fourragere, Belgian Fourragere 1940, cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action at Elsenborn Crest, Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered Honogchon), Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations (streamers embroidered Naktong River Line, and Korea).

3rd Inf Div patch
3rd Inf Div

Worn from:  24 October 1918 - Current.

The Third Division was organized at Camp Greene, North Carolina, in 1917 and arrived in France in 1918.  It was in the Chateau-Thierry sector 31 May to 29 July and stopped the German offensive of 15 - 18 July, the last of the enemy offensives.  Its conduct on that occasion earned it the title "Marne Division."  The three white stripes are symbolic of the six campaigns (formerly referred to as the three major operations)--the Marne, St.-Mihiel, and the Meuse-Argonne -- in which the division participated in World War I.  The blue field symbolizes the loyalty of those who placed their lives on the altar of self-sacrifice in defense of the American ideals of liberty and democracy.

Current location:  Fort Stewart and Fort Benning, Georgia.

Campaigns:  World War I (Aisne, Champagne-Marne, Aisne-Marne, St.-Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne 1918), World War II (Algeria-French Morocco, Tunisia, Sicily, Naples-Foggia, Anzio, Rome-Arno, Southern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe),Korean War (CCF Intervention, First UN Counteroffensive,  CCF Spring Offensive, UN Summer-Fall Offensive, Second Winter, Summer-Fall 1952, Third Winter, Summer 1953), Armed Forces Expeditions (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait).

Decorations:  Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered Colmar), French Croix de Guerre with Palm -- World War II (streamer embroidered Colmar), French Croix de Guerre -- World War II Fourragere, Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations (streamers embroidered Uijongby, and Iron Triangle), Chryssoun Aristion Andrias (streamer embroidered Korea).

4th Inf Div patch
4th Inf Div

Worn from:  30 October 1918 - 13 September 1968.

he Fourth Division was organized at Camp Greene, North Carolina in 1917.  The four leaves of the insignia allude to the numerical designation of the division, while the word "Ivy" as pronounced suggests the characters used in the formation of the roman numeral "IV."  Ivy leaves are symbolic of fidelity and tenacity.

Campaigns:  World War I (Aisne-Marne, St.-Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne 1918, Lorraine 1918), World War II (Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe), Vietnam (Counteroffensive Phases II/III/IV/V/VI/VII, Tet and Tet/69 Counter- offensives, Sanctuary Counteroffensive, Summer-Fall 1969, Winter- Spring 1970).

Decorations:  Belgian Fourragere 1940, cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action in Belgium, cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action in the Ardennes, Republic of Vietnam Crosses of Gallantry with Palm (streamers embroidered Vietnam 1966 - 1969; Vietnam 1969 - 1970), Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal -- First Class (streamer embroidered Vietnam 1966 - 1969).


4th Inf Div patch 2
4th Inf Div2

 

Worn from:  13 September 1968 - Current.

In typical slang of the 1960's., the division went through combat in Vietnam as the "Funky Fourth" as well as the "Poison Ivy Division."

Current location:  Ft. Hood, Texas and Ft. Carson, Colorado.

5th Inf Div patch
5th Inf Div

Worn from:  20 October 1918 - 1993.

The Fifth Division was organized in December 1917 at Camp Logan, Texas.  The red diamond originated as a color marking of the division's transport and equipment during World War I.  Red was selected as a compliment to the commanding general of the division in France whose branch of service was artillery.  The ace of diamonds was selected from the trade name "Diamond dye -- it never runs."  The red diamond represents a well-known problem in bridge building; it is made p of two adjacent isosceles triangles which make for the greatest strength.

Campaigns:  World War I (St.-Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Alsace 1918, Lorraine 1918), World War II (Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe), Armed Forces Expeditions (Panama).


6th Inf Div patch
6th Inf Div

Worn from:  20 October 1918 - 21 June 1922.

This design, approved in World War I for the Sixth Division, was never produced in woven textile.  The patch was made for collectors.  It is doubtful whether the design with the arabic number six was ever approved.


6th Inf Div patch 2
6th Inf Div2

Worn from:  20 October 1918 - Current.

The Sixth Division was organized at Camp McClellan, Alabama, in November 1917 and arrived in France in 1918.  This division reportedly marched more than any other and became known as the "Sight-seeing Sixth."  The insignia, a six-pointed star, refers to the numerical designation of the division.

Current location:  Ft. Richardson, Alaska (First Brigade).

Campaigns:  World War I (Meuse-Argonne, Alsace 1918), World War II (New Guinea, Luzon), Armed Forces Expeditions (Panama, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait).

Decorations:  Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered 17 October 1944 - July 1945).


6th Abn Div patch
6th Abn Div

Date approved:  3 August 1944.

The design represents an open parachute against a blue sky.

7th Inf Div patch
7th Inf Div

Worn from:  23 October 1918 - 1994.

The Seventh Division was organized at Camp Wheeler, Georgia, in January 1918.  The insignia originated by using two figure sevens, one inverted and superimposed upon the other.  Later, the figure was transformed into an hourglass.  The hourglass refers to the numerical designation and nickname of the division.  A new nickname, the "Bayonet Division," became synonymous with the Seventh during its participation in the Korean War and symbolizes the fighting spirit of the men.

Current location:  Ft. Lewis, Washington (First Brigade).

Campaigns:  World War I (Lorraine, 1918), World War II (Aleutian Islands, Eastern Mandates, Leyte, Ryukyus), Korean War (UN Defensive, UN Offensive, CCF Intervention, First UN Coutneroffensive, CCF Spring Offensive, UN Summer-Fall Offensive, Second Winter, Summer-Fall 1952, Third Winter, Summer 1953), Armed Forces Expeditions (Panama, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait).

Decorations:  Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered 17 October 1944 - 4 July 1945), Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations (streamers embroidered Inchon; Korea 1950 - 1953; Korea 1945 - 1948; and Korea 1953 - 1971).

8th Inf Div patch
8th Inf Div

Worn from:  8 April 1919 - 1992.

The Eighth Division was organized in January 1918 at Camp Fremont, California.  The nickname "Pathfinder" was received by the division during World War I and is represented by the arrow.  The arabic number eight identifies the division's numerical designation.

Campaigns:  World War I, World War II (Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Central Europe).

Decorations:  Luxembourg Croix de Guerre (streamer embroidered Luxembourg).

9th Inf Div patch
9th Inf Div

Worn from:  13 March 1925 - Current.

The Ninth Division was organized in July 1918 at camp Sheridan, Alabama.  The double quatrefoil, a heraldic mark of cadency for the ninth son, is red and blue, the colors of an infantry division's distinguishing flag.  The white center is the color of the numerals on the Ninth Division's World War II flag.  During the Vietnam War, the division's insignia inspired such nicknames as "Flower Power" and "The Psychedelic Cookie."  In Vietnam, the Third Brigade was part of the Riverine Force, a special multi-branch organization conducting operations in the Mekong River Delta area.

Campaigns:  World War II (Algeria-French Morocco, Tunisia, Sicily, Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe), Vietnam (Counteroffensive Phases II/III/IV/V/VI, Tet and Tet/69 Counteroffensives, Summer-Fall 1969), Armed Forces Expeditions (Panama).

Decorations:  Belgian Fourragere 1940, cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action at the Meuse River, cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action in the Ardennes, Republic of Vietnam Crosses of Gallantry with Palm (streamers embroidered Vietnam 1966 - 1968, and Vietnam 1969), Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal -- First Class (streamer embroidered Vietnam 1966 - 1969).

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