Military Ranger Patches History

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Information extracted from the book
"US ARMY PATCHES"
by Barry Jason Stein

Used by permission

5307th Composit Unit 1 patch
5307th Composite Unit

Worn from:  October 1943 - 10 August 1944.

Approved for local wear only.

Many variations of this patch exist (this being a handmade version of local origin).  Blue, red, green, and white represent four of the original six combat teams which were identified by color.  The khaki and orange team colors are not represented.  The unit's link with the Chinese is represented by the twelve-pointed sun symbol.  The star of Burma represents the geographical location of operations.  The lightning bolt is a symbol for speed and striking power, symbols of General Frank D. Merrill's force, also known as the "Galahad Force."

Campaigns:  World War II (India-Burma).

 


5307th Composit Unit 2 patch
5307th Composite Unit
 

Worn from:  October 1943 - 10 August 1944.

Approved for local wear only.

Many variations of this patch exist (this being a handmade version of local origin).  Blue, red, green, and white represent four of the original six combat teams which were identified by color.  The khaki and orange team colors are not represented.  The unit's link with the Chinese is represented by the twelve-pointed sun symbol.  The star of Burma represents the geographical location of operations.  The lightning bolt is a symbol for speed and striking power, symbols of General Frank D. Merrill's force, also known as the "Galahad Force."

Campaigns:  World War II (India-Burma).


Jingpaw Rangers patch
Jingpaw Rangers

Worn from:  March 1942 - 12 July 1945.

Approved for local wear only.

"Jingpaw" is the tribal name for the Kachin Indians, who were formed into a guerilla fighting force by agents of the Office of Strategic Services Detachment 101.  The red, white, and blue shield denotes the American force that organized them.

Campaigns:  World War II (India-Burma, central Burma).


Kachin Rangers patch
Kachin Rangers

Worn from:  March 1942 - 12 July 1945.

Approved for local wear only

Worn interchangeably with the Jingpaw patch by American agents and Burmese rangers.

Campaigns:  World War II (India-Burma, central Burma).


Manchu Raiders patch

Manchu Raiders

Worn from:  1952 - 1953.

Approved for local wear only.

The dragon is taken from the design of the Ninth Infantry Regiment's distinctive unit insignia and alludes to service in China.


oss patch
OSS

Worn from:  July 1942 - October 1945 (Unauthorized).

The color black alludes to special operations performed under the cover of darkness.  The spearhead suggests the fighting capabilities of the service.  The two bands on the spearhead represent the army and the navy.


24th Div Raiders patch
24th Div Raiders

Worn from:  9 July 1952 - 27 July 1953.

Approved for local wear only.

The design is that of a taro leaf, which is representative of the Twenty-fifth Division as well as the old Hawaiian Division and the current Twenty-fourth Infantry Division.


25th Div Raiders patch
25th Div Raiders

Worn from:  9 July 1952 - 27 July 1953.

Approved for local wear only.

The insignia of the Twenty-fifth Infantry Division has a skull incorporated in the design, which is common to recon and raider units.  The tab with inscription "Korea" reflects the unit's service in this conflict.


OSS 310th Ops Gp patch
OSS 310th Ops Gp

Worn from:  1943 - 1945.

The black disk represents the darkness in which Office of Strategic Services operations took place.  The chameleon, noted for its ability to change colors, represents the special operations nature of the unit.  The numerical designation of the group is incorporated in the China-Burma-India insignia.


Alamo Scouts 6th Army patch

Alamo Scouts 6th Army

Worn from:  March 1945 - September 1945.

The Alamo Scouts were a reconnaissance team active in the Pacific theater during World War II.  The patch features the head of an Indian, representing silent reconnaissance, superimposed over the Alamo, a famous landmark in San Antonio, Texas.  Starting 27 December 1943, ten teams of Alamo Scouts initiated training at the Alamo Scout Training center at Fergusson Island near Good Enough Island, New Guinea.  The scouts performed over sixty combat and intelligence gathering raids in both New Guinea and the Philippine Islands.


1st Recon Bn Philippines patch
1st Recon Bn Philippines

Dates worn:  7 December 1941 - 10 May 1942.

The head of a water buffalo symbolizes the Philippine Islands, while the stars represent the constellation of the Southern Cross under which the battalion operated.


ranger bn tab
Ranger Bn

Worn from:  19 June 1943 - 8 July 1946.

The lozenge shape was originally worn by the Second and Fifth Battalions before they changed to the scroll design.

RangerTab
Ranger Tab
 




June 1942 - October 1945 (Unauthorized).

Combat_Inf_Badge_Back_Button

Combat_Inf_Badge_Button

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