Transportation Patches History

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Information extracted from the book
"US ARMY PATCHES"  
by Barry Jason Stein
Used by permission


2nd Trans Cmd patch
2nd Trans Cmd


Worn from: 
12 July 1968 - May 1971.

The design of the insignia was originally approved in 1968 for the Second Transportation Terminal Command.  The wavy partition line refers to the command's operation of water terminals and over-the-shore sites.  The annulets stand for wheels, symbol of transportation.  They are two in number, in reference to the organization's numerical designation.  The two curved spaces between the spokes simulate a taeguk, in allusion to the command's activation in Korea in 1960.

Campaigns:  World War II (East Indians, Papua, New Guinea).

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation (streamer embroidered Papua), Meritorious Unit Commendation (streamer embroidered Korea).

 

3rd Trans Agency patch
3rd Trans Agency


Worn from: 
27 October 1969 - 8 September 1972.

Re-designated:  Third Transportation Brigade.  Worn from:  8 September 1972 - 1994.

Re-designated:  Third Transportation Agency.  Worn from:  16 September 1994 - Current.

The segment of railway track symbolizes the basic mission of the brigade, and the three ties allude to its numerical designation.  The five-pointed star is symbolic of command.

Campaigns:  World War II (European-African-Middle Eastern theater, Asiatic-Pacific theater), Korean War (UN Defense, UN Offensive, CCF Intervention, First UN Counteroffensive, CCF Spring Offensive, UN Summer-Fall Offensive, Second Winter, Summer-Fall 1952, Third Winter, Summer 1953).

Decorations:  Meritorious Unit Commendations (streamers embroidered Iran; Japan; Korea 1950 - 1951; Korea 1951 - 1952; Korea 1952 - 1953; and Korea 1953 - 1954), Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations (streamers embroidered Korea 1950 - 1962, and Korea 1952 - 1953).



4th Trans Cmd patch
4th Trans Cmd


Worn from: 
26 June 1967 - 12 May 1975.

Re-designated:  Fourth Transportation Brigade.  Worn from:  12 May 1975 - 18 February 1981.

Re-designated:  Fourth Transportation Command.  Worn from:  18 February 1981 - 1991.

The wheel, a symbol for movement, and the trident, an attribute of Poseidon (god of the sea in Greek mythology) allude to the mission of the organization in the movement of vital cargo across land and waterway.

Campaigns:  World War II (Normandy, Northern France), Vietnam (Defense, Counteroffensive and Phases II/III/IV/V/VI/VIII, Tet and Tet/69 Counteroffensives, Summer-Fall 1969, Winter-Spring 1970, Sanctuary Counteroffensive, Consolidation I and II, Cease-Fire).

Decorations:  Meritorious Unit Commendations (streamers embroidered France 1944; France 1945; and Vietnam 1963 - 1969).



5th Trans Cmd patch
5th Trans Cmd


Worn from: 
13 April 1967 - 5 June 1972.

The wedge or V-shape indicates the numerical designation of the command.  The disc represents the wheel, a symbol basic to transporta - tion.  The star at the wheel's hub represents the command function.

Campaigns:  World War II (Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes - Alsace, Central Europe), Vietnam (Counteroffensive Phases IV/V/VI/VII, Tet/69 Counteroffensive, Summer-Fall 1969, Winter-Spring 1970, Sanctuary Counteroffensive, Consolidation I and II).

Decorations:  Meritorious Unit Commendations (streamers embroidered European Theater 1944, and European Theater 1945), cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian army for action at Antwerp.


7th Trans Gp patch
7th Trans Gp


Worn from: 
10 April 1967 - 10 April 1071.

Re-designated:  Seventh Transportation Group -- Composite.  Worn from:  1994 - Current.

The rays issuing from the center of the shield refer to the receiving and dispersal of personnel and cargo.  The rays are seven in number in reference to the numerical designation of the organization.  The "rook" is the chess piece for a castle, medieval stronghold of fighting men and supplies.  The name is derived from the Persian word "rokh," meaning a soldier, and is used to represent the military troops and equipment being transferred from one mode of transportation to another.  Blue, the infantry color, refers to the organization's capability of defending itself as infantry against hostile ground attack.

Campaigns:  World War II (European-African-Middle Eastern theater), Korean War (UN Defensive, UN Offensive, CCF Intervention, First UN Counteroffensive, CCF Spring Offensive, UN Summer-Fall Offensive, Second Winter, Summer-Fall 1952, Third Winter, Summer 1953), Armed Forces Expeditions (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait).

Decorations:  Meritorious Unit Commendations (streamers embroidered Korea 1950 - 1954, and Korea 1953 - 1954), Republic of Korea Presi - dential Unit Citations (streamers embroidered Korea 1950 - 1952, and Korea 1951 - 1953).


11th Trans Cmd patch
11th Trans Cmd


Worn from: 
15 January 1969 - 1970.

The design of the insignia was originally approved in 1969 for the Eleventh Transportation Command.  The wheel, a basic implement of mobility, represents transportation; the wavy blue area, symbolic of water, refers to the port functions of the unit. Activations of the unit in the United States, Korea, and France are represented by the two white and one blue areas.  The two vertical bars, simulating piers supports for wharves and docks, indicate the numerical designation of the unit.

Campaigns:  World War II (Normandy, Northern France).

Decorations:  Meritorious Unit Commendation (streamer embroidered European Theater).



32nd Trans Cmd patch
32nd Trans Cmd


Worn from: 
5 December 1968 - 1969.

The wheel, a symbol of transportation, and the wavy blue bar, indicative of water, refer to the command's mission in the transfer of personnel and cargo from one mode of transportation to another at water terminals.  Together with the arrows, they also refer to the logistical over-the-shore (LOTS) operation sites, air, and other type terminals.  The blue water and yellow background also denote the unit's allotment to the United States Army Reserve located at Tampa, Florida; yellow is for Florida, the "Sun - shine State", and Tampa is its largest seaport.  Additionally, the three spokes and two arrows allude to the numerical designation of the command.



107th Trans Bde patch
107th Trans Bde

Worn from:  17 May 1966 - 12 January 1969.

The wheel is a basic symbol for transportation.  The structure of the wheel in this design is an allusion to the numerical designation of the brigade; the rim being "one O' and the spokes being seven in number.


124th Trans Bde patch
124th Trans Bde

Worn from:  20 June 1966 - 1 May 1972.

The design of the insignia was originally approved in 1967 for the 124th Transportation Command.  The winged wheel symbolizes two of the roles of Transportation -- air and rail movement.


125th Trans Cmd patch
125th Trans Cmd


Worn from: 
1967 - 10 February 1970.

The wheel symbolizes the basic aspects of movement, and, with the anchor, refers to the organization's mission in support of amphibious operations.

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